Phil Wilson Quoted By The Economist

Phil Wilson Quoted By The Economist

“Leaders who rely on power get burned, and yet, many of them rely on position or formal authority to get things done.”  Phil Wilson was responding to questions about bad habits executives can fall prey to.

Terri Williams, writing for the Executive Education Navigator, an executive education site run by The Economist magazine, reached out to Phil for his insight into leadership habits. The article identifies 4 bad habits, among them the reliance on positional authority. Phil enumerates some of the dangers of this approach, and explains that “relying on formal authority—versus relationship—increases ‘power distance’ and creates gaps with your team.”

It is a quick read and a worthwhile article.

Phil Quoted in Fast Company Article on Employee Motivation

Phil Quoted in Fast Company Article on Employee Motivation

Fast Company’s recent article “The Link Between Employee Motivation and Their Manager’s Mental State” dives into a new study from the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes that looked at how a leader’s mindset affects his or her team’s performance.

What the study found is that “bosses can modify their mindset to produce a certain outcome from workers, whether that’s innovation or a more conservative work focus aimed at meeting basic obligations and preventing errors.”

Stephanie Vozza, author of the Fast Company piece, broke down these two basic leader mindsets – innovative versus promotion focused – with the help of Christopher Porter, professor of management at Indiana University Kelley School of Business, and our very own Phil Wilson of Approachable Leadership.

Check the article out here.

Phil Teaches 4 Execution Habits at Leadership Event

Phil Teaches 4 Execution Habits at Leadership Event

Last week, Phil delivered a keynote for the Arbuckle Area SHRM chapter and the Southern Oklahoma Leadership Luncheon. The topic? Follow up and follow through.

“The real place where the rubber meets the road as a leader is, do I actually do what I say that I’m going to do, or, do I overcommit and say I’m going to do a lot of things and don’t actually follow through on it?”

This is where the Approachable Leadership COPE method comes in: Capture, Organize, Prioritize, and Execute.

Check out this article in the Daily Ardmoreite to learn more.

Fast Company Features Phil Wilson: 6 Signs You’re Management Material

Fast Company Features Phil Wilson: 6 Signs You’re Management Material

Fast Company published an article last week detailing what makes a person “management material.”

After consulting a number of experts, they came up with these 6 traits:

  1. You’re good at building relationships. “You cannot be a leader unless people are willing to follow you…To have followers, you need to be skilled at developing and maintaining relationships.”
  2. You’re approachable. “Employees of approachable bosses are less likely to quit and more likely to engage in “above-and-beyond” behavior at work…If you’re approachable you’ll be a successful leader. If you’re unapproachable over the long run you will fail.”
  3. You look at the big picture. “To manage, you need to be able to see the big picture; how pieces of the organization fit together, and how a change in one area will affect another.”
  4. You think strategically. “You should understand the environment inside and outside of the organization…You need skills in problem identification and analysis, and must be able to generate and evaluate solutions.”
  5. You can check your ego at the door. “Focusing on leaving behind a better team than you found is important, but the leader needs to be comfortable with letting other people shine for this to work.”
  6. You have a proven track record of results. “When credibility, competence, and aspiration are all evident, the odds of the person successfully transitioning from an individual contributor into a management are greatly increased.”

We’ll let you guess which piece of advice was ours.

Do you have anything to add to this list? Or tips to help people develop these qualities? We’d love for you to share them with us!